Votes Needed: Best Live Act

Getting booked in Boston is getting harder by the year. Now imagine being an instrumentalist getting booked. This is why it’s important we receive your vote!

Limelight Magazine has nominated Patrick for Best Live Act of 2013. To vote, simply click this link, go to category #3 to select and click “Submit” at the bottom of the screen.

Voting ends 02/07 at 11.45pm. You can vote as much and as often as you like.

Thank you for your support!

Mobile App Now Live

Patrick has partnered with ReverbNation to develop his own mobile app (Android users only). This free Mobile App lets you listen his music, check out photos and videos, read blog posts and get exclusive push notifications straight to your mobile device.

Due to the cost associated with developing an app for iPhone/ iTouch users, there are no immediate plans to make this available on Mac-based systems. We apologize for this inconvenience.

Android users can download the app HERE.

When Art Precedes Sound

On May 17th, a well-known, highly respected musician decided not to take the stage at a venue in San Antonio due to problems with the venue. I was shocked – or was I? Here’s my take on artists choosing not to perform when certain things are out of their control.

The Fan’s Perspective

Imagine this: it’s a Friday night and you’re one of 250 who paid $35 to see a rock show in the city. A member from one of your favorite bands has gone solo and is riding the success of a 30+ year run in the music business. Of course this artist could reunite with the band and sell more tickets in bigger venues – but this is THEIR time.

Your excitement has been building since getting tickets: the babysitter’s booked, pre-show dinner reservations made and your night will end with great music. Sadly, by the time you reach the front doors of the venue, your night is over. The artist showed but left hours ago with no word on why there would be no performance that night.

The Musician’s Perspective

Another town, another gig. After loading in, your sound check hasn’t been going right. Is it you – or the venue? You tweak things a bit but still can’t get your tone right but also know it’s not the first time sound has been an issue at this particular club.

The situation is addressed with the venue, the promoter and everyone involved. You use different mic-ing techniques, going “direct” (bypassing any microphones and plugging directly into the venue’s mixing board) and explore all options. Still, something isn’t right.

Then what? What happens next?

The Reality Of It All

If you’re DUg Pinnick of King’s X, you call it all off. His show was over well before it began (read about it HERE). When first sing this, I was floored – what a ballsy move! I know of musicians simply not showing to gigs or leaving the stage due to poor security but never due to sound. Pinnick’s support was overwhelming with assumedly most fans far removed from the situation making it easier to comment in approval.

But what if it wasn’t a well-known musician? What if you planned for it months ago and traveled a ways to see? As a fan, would you still have unwavering support for the artist?

One Person’s Perspective

His decision made me think about my situation. The tones I get out of my guitar are everything to me. If my tones are off, I’m off. I’ve never blamed anyone but myself if I can’t get it right. But what if I just knew it wasn’t my fault? What if a venue’s speaker(s) was blown, or poor cables were used or they cut corners on equipment?

Am I in a position to walk away from a gig? I know I can – but actually doing it becomes complicated. Every gig is an opportunity, regardless of where it is and who’s there. Someone’s always ready/ willing to take your spot. Having the benefit of gigging around Boston also means more friends and family attending shows for support. Can I leave them out to dry?

I’ve met DUg at the NAMM show. He’s one of the nicest people I’ve met and it’s obvious music is his life. For him to walk away, I can’t imagine how difficult of a decision it was – but for me, it’s not something I can do… unless of cousre I was gigging with DUg Pinnick.

Ed. Note: with at least 2 sides to every story, I found the club’s response HERE. The other bands, including guitar god Yngwie Malmsteen, played the show without incident (full review HERE). Requests for refunds from the club were honored.

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Your votes = 08/16 Show!

Thank you to everyone who voted for us to perform at the Midday Social’s “Battle of the Bands” event.  Because of your support, we are now scheduled to perform in Providence, RI on 08/16/13 at Platforms Nightclub!!

As posted on Facebook: Come celebrate local music with us on Friday, August 16 and watch 8 great bands compete to perform at the next The Midday Social!

All Ages | Doors at 7:00 PM | Only 6 Bucks

After a week long online poll and 1,279 votes the following bands will be performing in front of our celebrity industry panel of judges:
Fly Kite Canvas
Mals Totem
Mister Vertigo
SixTenConnector
blackbutton
Patrick DeCoste
Cad
Jessica Prouty Band

These bands need your support! Each band will get a 20 min set. The entire event will be aired live by 990WBOB. https://www.facebook.com/990wbob

The judges are: Scarpetti from 94 HJY, Marc Clarkin of Motif Magazine & Denny Rochefort of GENERAL ASSEMBLY

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Runner up prices include a song featured on the next Midday Records compilation, an interview on 990wbob, as well as other great prices soon to be announced.

Free Show – 07/31/13 (Rhode Island)

This show’s on us!  On Wednesday 07/31/13 we return to Rhode Island for a full band show.  Simply click on the image below (or this link), print the ticket, hand it in at the door and enjoy the show!

MardiGrasRI

Show Details:
Wednesday 07/31/13
Mardi Gras Club
Cranston, RI
9pm – Free!!
Courtesy of Bad-Dog Promotions

 

The National Anthem Blog

For the past 8 years, I’ve had the amazing experience of playing the Star Spangled Banner in some of the biggest & most historic venues in the USA.  Here are some of the questions I’ve been asked over the years:

 How Did You Get The Gig?

From what I’ve learned, the music business is a business of contacts and thick skin.  “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know” is an understatement.  Anthem gigs are the one exception.  Shea Stadium was my first anthem experience and that came about by simply going to the sports team’s website, getting the contact info to mail/ emailing my press kit and hoping to get a call.  That’s how most of my anthem gigs happen.  As my resume gets stronger and I gain more contacts in the industry, so will my chances – hopefully.

What Goes Through Your Head When Playing?

The more I think about it, the worse it is.  All preparation happens during practice beforehand.  I try not to over-practice, take care of my sounds/ equipment (ie echoes, distortion, amp noise, etc.) and eliminate any potential problems days before the gig.  If I can downplay the experience and take it for what it is (1min and 15sec of music), the smoother it usually goes.

How Do You Prepare For Something Like That?
YouTube.  Imagination.  Past experiences.  If I can research the venue prior by watching other anthem videos and seeing where they stand, how they sound, and the amount of people in the crowd, I can get an idea of what to expect.

What Equipment Do You Take?
Less is more.  The faster I set-up/ break-down, the smoother things are.  I always bring 2 guitars (1 main guitar, 1 back-up) and an extra shirt (I tend to sweat when playing in 104 degrees).  Here’s my checklist.

What’s The Most/ Least Amount Of People You’ve Playing In Front Of?
The Shea gig was 50,000+ – everything else, not so much.  I have different guitar settings for the amount of people in the crowd.  The emptier the arena (especially domed arenas), the more sounds will echo.  If it’s a packed house, I add echoes to my sound but let the venue dictate the echoes in less crowded settings.

Why Not Play It Like Hendrix?
1. Because I can’t.  2. I’m not Hendrix.  3. Because it’s been done.  4. It’s a different era.  Sport teams want a conservative version.  Years ago I sent a crazy rock version I did and got a call back from a team saying I’d get boo-ed if I played it that way.  I still think what I put together was original, catchy and enjoyable but oh well.  The more violent the sport, the more likely I’ll play a rock version than a conservative version.  There’s only been one occasion where someone hasn’t asked if I would play the Hendrix version.

What’s The Process To Get Booked?
After mailing in your submission, they’ll get back to you if interested.  Sometimes they have a number of dates to pick from or just one to fill.  Parking, arrival times/ sound check, comp tickets, etc. are sorted out beforehand.  When you get there, you’ll usually get your pass(es) at will call/ front desk.  The person I’ve traded emails with is usually the game time contact but not always.  If there’s a soundcheck, it’s before the gates open and usually lasts about 1 minute (ie “Can you can hear your guitar?  Yes?  Ok – we’re done”).  Then you wait for hours and are expected back about 10 minutes before performance time.  It’s over in a flash I get off the court/ field asap.  Hopefully there’s a secure place to store my gear so I can enjoy the game!  No two anthem gigs are alike – even if you’ve played the venue before.

Any Crazy Stories?
Aside from the time I forgot to bring my guitars? True story – I left my house with everything except my guitars one time.  Luckily, my wife did the “idiot check” (ie ask me what I’m forgetting) and we had enough time to turn around and get them.  Then there was the time the front desk employee told us to stand and wait in the corner for 20 minutes while the Game Operations staff came to get us.  I remember one time getting the countdown to when I’d be live and still wasn’t getting any signal out of my guitar until 3 seconds before playing (a cable became unplugged when it was being moved around by game staff).  All those things happened at the same gig, by the way.  I won’t even get into the time I was told to be back in the waiting room at 6.45pm and heard my introduction at 6.40pm while I was roaming around the stadium…

How Can I Get Those Gigs?
Keep trying: I get rejected (ie never hear back) more than I get accepted.  Be thankful: build upon each experience, learn from them and use that knowledge to better yourself. Lastly, remember to send your submissions in well before the start of the season.  Some baseball teams won’t accept submissions after mid-February even though the season starts in April.  Be courteous and mindful that they get 1,000s of submissions each year so make what you send stand out.  Never burn any bridges – it’s not worth it.

Have more questions? Please leave them in the “Comment” box below!

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