When Art Precedes Sound

On May 17th, a well-known, highly respected musician decided not to take the stage at a venue in San Antonio due to problems with the venue. I was shocked – or was I? Here’s my take on artists choosing not to perform when certain things are out of their control.

The Fan’s Perspective

Imagine this: it’s a Friday night and you’re one of 250 who paid $35 to see a rock show in the city. A member from one of your favorite bands has gone solo and is riding the success of a 30+ year run in the music business. Of course this artist could reunite with the band and sell more tickets in bigger venues – but this is THEIR time.

Your excitement has been building since getting tickets: the babysitter’s booked, pre-show dinner reservations made and your night will end with great music. Sadly, by the time you reach the front doors of the venue, your night is over. The artist showed but left hours ago with no word on why there would be no performance that night.

The Musician’s Perspective

Another town, another gig. After loading in, your sound check hasn’t been going right. Is it you – or the venue? You tweak things a bit but still can’t get your tone right but also know it’s not the first time sound has been an issue at this particular club.

The situation is addressed with the venue, the promoter and everyone involved. You use different mic-ing techniques, going “direct” (bypassing any microphones and plugging directly into the venue’s mixing board) and explore all options. Still, something isn’t right.

Then what? What happens next?

The Reality Of It All

If you’re DUg Pinnick of King’s X, you call it all off. His show was over well before it began (read about it HERE). When first sing this, I was floored – what a ballsy move! I know of musicians simply not showing to gigs or leaving the stage due to poor security but never due to sound. Pinnick’s support was overwhelming with assumedly most fans far removed from the situation making it easier to comment in approval.

But what if it wasn’t a well-known musician? What if you planned for it months ago and traveled a ways to see? As a fan, would you still have unwavering support for the artist?

One Person’s Perspective

His decision made me think about my situation. The tones I get out of my guitar are everything to me. If my tones are off, I’m off. I’ve never blamed anyone but myself if I can’t get it right. But what if I just knew it wasn’t my fault? What if a venue’s speaker(s) was blown, or poor cables were used or they cut corners on equipment?

Am I in a position to walk away from a gig? I know I can – but actually doing it becomes complicated. Every gig is an opportunity, regardless of where it is and who’s there. Someone’s always ready/ willing to take your spot. Having the benefit of gigging around Boston also means more friends and family attending shows for support. Can I leave them out to dry?

I’ve met DUg at the NAMM show. He’s one of the nicest people I’ve met and it’s obvious music is his life. For him to walk away, I can’t imagine how difficult of a decision it was – but for me, it’s not something I can do… unless of cousre I was gigging with DUg Pinnick.

Ed. Note: with at least 2 sides to every story, I found the club’s response HERE. The other bands, including guitar god Yngwie Malmsteen, played the show without incident (full review HERE). Requests for refunds from the club were honored.

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The Boston University Speech

On 03/21/13, I spoke on the Boston University Medical Campus at a public speaking workshop.  Ironically, I chose to speak about not speaking.  Below is the draft reference I worked on prior to stepping to the podium.

The Art of Speaking Without Having To Say Anything

[dropcap]I[/dropcap]’d like to start by saying I’m not up here because of my fear of being in front of people.  I believe a lot of one’s anxiety in public speaking is not being vocal but the thought of being the center of attention.  I can honestly stand in front of you today and say… I’m fairly comfortable.  Being the center of attention ISN’T my issue – whether it’s in front 5 people, 15 people or 50,000 people.  The number of people watching me doesn’t bother me.  I will however say my nervousness comes from the actual act of speaking – my inability to think on my feet, to get the information out of my head and say it confidently and intelligently.

I’m able to say I feel confident when standing alone in front of 50,000 people – because actually – I’ve done it!  Let me take you back a few years to August 8th, 2007.  Does the date ring a bell with anyone?  It was a Wednesday… it was raining… Anyway, that morning I had packed my bags and drove out to Queens, NY.  It’s a 5 hour drive from Boston and made the trip because I agreed to take a job.  It didn’t very pay well (actually it didn’t pay at all!) and I was “hired” for to do something that lasted 75 seconds.  So if you’re a finance person like me and are crunching the numbers in your head, yes – I drove 10 hours roundtrip for 1 minute and 15 seconds worth of work.

You probably think I’m crazy… and you’re probably right!  But hear me out: this opportunity found me standing in front of 51,749 people with TV cameras everywhere and literally all eyes on me.  I wasn’t in any work group, part of an audience or a member of any team.  It was just me standing in 108 degree weather wearing jeans and a long sleeved collared shirt – and I was surprisingly okay.  I was surprisingly okay because the beauty of the story is I didn’t have to speak – AT ALL!

Here I was standing in the middle of Shea Stadium, with ESPN cameras surrounding me and no one to rely on.  All I had to do was play guitar.  My “job”, that day, was to play my instrumental version of the Star Spangled Banner before the Mets/ Braves game on ESPN’s Game-Of-The-Week.  In the very stadium which hosted Billy Joel, the Stones, the Beatles, Elton John – the very stadium where my beloved Boston Red Sox lost game 6 on the 1986 World Series when the ball went through Bill Buckner’s legs in one of the most dramatic sports moments of all time.  There I was playing guitar surrounded by it all.  How well did I play?  That’s up for debate… I find it a bit drastic for the Mets to demolish the stadium a few months after I left.  But regardless, the beauty of performing the anthem is the guaranteed standing ovation!

From that experience, I was able to take advantage of many other amazing experiences where I stood alone before large crowds.  I’ve played the anthem in other arenas, shared the stage with some of my guitar idols and even performed in the orchestra pit for a Grammy-winning musical.  But again, none involved any amount of speaking – AT ALL.

With that being said, I admire the steps you are taking to build your public speaking skills, for whatEVER reason you may have, whether it be personal, professional or otherwise.  I’ve looked forward to my time here with you – seeing you overcome your fears and become the speaker you want to be.  I’d like the same for myself!

Thank you for awarding me this opportunity and hope you can be just as comfortable with speaking as I am with having a guitar in hands.

Thank you.

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The “Hairspray” Experience: Summer 2010

This is my blog, insight and experience while playing in the Broadway produced musical, “Hairspray”.  I was asked tons of questions about it – from playing the pit, to off-stage happenings and everything in between.  Hopefully this answers them.

Before The Show:

I was referred to by local guitar virtuoso, Steve Marchena.  Steve played at the Cape Playhouse last summer but was already booked doing another theater gig.

The Preparation:

Once signed on, I bought as much “Hairspray” goodies I could: the original movie, its remake, the music, etc.  I spent a lot of time brushing up on my reading skills, music theory and chord harmony.  A major focus was on transposing music which is the ability to read music in one musical key while playing it in another (the equivalent of reading a speech in English but having to narrate it in Spanish).   The cast began rehearsals in NYC 2 weeks prior to opening night.  They rehearsed with the musical director, Jesse Vargas (who also doubles as Clay Aiken’s musical director), who also accompanied them on piano.  The band received their books and accompanying CD 1 week prior to opening night.  The book and CD had 2 guitar parts that I combined into one.  We were sent “cut sheets” later that week (cut sheets show which parts will be skipped: the Broadway production’s cast was larger than ours so we “cut” longer sections out).

The Rehearsal:

The band had 1 4-hour rehearsal the day prior to opening night.  We consisted of bass, drums, guitar, 2 keyboards, 2 brass and 2 woodwind players (half had played at the Playhouse prior).  We ran through the easy pieces first and then went over the more complex section again.  The following day we were scheduled to do a dry run a few hours before opening that night but due to last minute changes/ tweaks/ unforeseen issues, we only rehearsed part of the 2nd act.

The Pit:

This pit was located in front of the stage, below the front row.  When looking at the stage, it consisted of 3 areas: the rhythm section on the left (drums, guitar, bass), the musical director/ conductor/ keyboardist raised to audience level in the middle (so the cast and band can see him) and the other keyboard player and horn section on the right.  Unless a scene took place near the edge of the stage or in the far right hand corner of the stage, I couldn’t see anything.

The show (3-week run):

Opening night went well considering that a good portion of it came together within 24 hours.  The first couple of shows were spent getting familiar with everything/ one.  Although we had a different conductor and keyboard player for the 3rd week, everything went smoothly.  Here’s a quick summary of factors that the musicians had to consider that you may not have seen:

Cues: Some cues happen almost immediately without much notice while others have a full “1-2-3-4” count-in before playing.  For quick cues, I’d write a note to myself about what dialog will happen before the next song.  For example, when I heard, “Oh my God, I’m going to kill myself!”, I knew “The Nicest Kids (Reprise)” was about to happen.  The cue for that song was a head nod upwards and we’d start playing on the downward nod.

Volume: Because I sat directly in front of my amp, I didn’t have a gauge on how loud/ soft I was playing.  More often than not, a guitarist is asked (begged?) to turn down but the musical director wanted more volume so I was more than happy to turn it up.  For certain songs he’d also call for “more gain” which sometimes can be misleading.  More gain in a theater setting usually means make the sound more distorted not necessarily louder whereas in at a club gig, it usually means play heavier (ie more heavy-metal sounding – louder, dirtier and more aggressive).

Note/ Rhythm Selection: For the first few shows, I tried to stick as close to what was written in the book as possible.  Some books tell you what to play note-for-note/ rhythm-for-rhythm and others have basic outlines and it’s up to you to fill in the blanks.  For example, one book may not only tell you to play a C Major chord but in what order the notes of that chord should be played.  My book left a lot of the parts open to interpretation but made sure to spell out particular parts.

Safeties: In musicals, there are certain parts of the play that don’t have a certain time duration because they vary from night to night.  For that reason, the music has certain “safety” sections.  Safeties are repeated music patterns (of various lengths) that the band repeats until told otherwise.  In “Without Love”, this safety at 2:00 – 3:00 consists of various key changes and lots of open space for the guitar.  My focus was on nailing the key changes, controlling my volume and waiting for each cue as the length of that part varied from night to night.

Schedule: The show ran a typical theater schedule: 8 shows per week – one day off (Sunday).  There was always a show at 8pm Monday – Saturday.  Depending on the week, there was a 4pm Saturday show and/ or 2pm show on either/ both Wednesday and Thursday.  After the 2pm Wednesday shows, the cast came out for a Q&A session with the audience.  I worked part-time through the show – I’d be out of the house at 7.15am and back after 12am.  I’d take an hour ride train into Boston and back for work, then drive 75 miles to Cape Cod and back.  I wasn’t immune to Cape traffic either which definitely resulted in some close calls.  Eating dinner in my car on the way wasn’t unusual and if I got there earlier enough, I was able to take a nap in my car.  Glamorous, huh?

Page Turns: This is a under-appreciated art form, in my opinion.  Page turns rarely happened at the bottom of each page.  More often than not, I’d turn the page before I needed to in order to not miss a beat (literally!).  I’d also write at the bottom of the page was happening next so I could play through a certain section, then turn the page where I’d see arrows pointing showing where I should be in the music.  Case and point: In 2:57 of “You Can’t Stop The Beat”, I had a page turn.  To get through, I actually wrote that part at the bottom of the page to get through it and then turned the page at 03:06 and play on through.

The Music: Honestly, I dug all the tunes.  Infectious grooves, interesting chord changes and lots of up-tempo numbers.  The opening number, “Good Morning Baltimore”, is a favorite.  Great song, great introduction to the musical.  Trying to solo like Chuck Berry in “The Nicest Kids In Town” was a blast.  “Welcome To The 60’s” is a great song.  “It Takes Two” was a blast.  “Without Love” and the jazz, swing songs were probably the hardest due to constant chord changes and trying to gel w/ the other instruments.

The Cast: Unfortunately, my interaction with the cast was minimal.  Aside from heading backstage to get water before/ during/ after the show, I kept mostly to myself.  It was an all-NYC cast and production which came from Broadway and several had starred in “Hairspray” before.  I did see a few of them in/ around the Playhouse but out of costume, I couldn’t place them and wouldn’t realize it until afterward.  Regardless, every night they earned their standing ovations.

The Venue: The Cape Playhouse is America’s oldest professional summer theater.  The NY Times billed it as the venue where Broadway goes for the summer.  It’s 84 years old and seats 600 people.  Because it’s an old, wooden theater, I needed to factor volume and reverb when setting up my sound.  It was the first time in theater’s history that a production ran for a 3rd week.

Miscellaneous: It wasn’t until the 2nd week that I realized the random light peltings I received on my back were hairpins from the wigs that actors were wearing…  Our dress code was all black…  A lot of people came back in week 3 to sit closer and view what happened in the pit (I heard a few “I’m here to help w/ the page turning” jokes)…  There were rumblings that the costumes stank and I’m told costume designers dip them in vodka to cure the odor…  It seemed the first ones out of the theater was the cast, then the audience, then the band…  Most cast and crew stayed in either a motel or in a rented house…  The actors’ microphones were found on their foreheads wired under their wigs.

Other HAIRSPRAY links: HAIRSPRAY Opens, HAIRSPRAY Rocks!, HAIRSPRAY Is Happening!, HAIRSPRAY Actor’s Ritual

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The National Anthem Blog

For the past 8 years, I’ve had the amazing experience of playing the Star Spangled Banner in some of the biggest & most historic venues in the USA.  Here are some of the questions I’ve been asked over the years:

 How Did You Get The Gig?

From what I’ve learned, the music business is a business of contacts and thick skin.  “It’s not what you know, it’s who you know” is an understatement.  Anthem gigs are the one exception.  Shea Stadium was my first anthem experience and that came about by simply going to the sports team’s website, getting the contact info to mail/ emailing my press kit and hoping to get a call.  That’s how most of my anthem gigs happen.  As my resume gets stronger and I gain more contacts in the industry, so will my chances – hopefully.

What Goes Through Your Head When Playing?

The more I think about it, the worse it is.  All preparation happens during practice beforehand.  I try not to over-practice, take care of my sounds/ equipment (ie echoes, distortion, amp noise, etc.) and eliminate any potential problems days before the gig.  If I can downplay the experience and take it for what it is (1min and 15sec of music), the smoother it usually goes.

How Do You Prepare For Something Like That?
YouTube.  Imagination.  Past experiences.  If I can research the venue prior by watching other anthem videos and seeing where they stand, how they sound, and the amount of people in the crowd, I can get an idea of what to expect.

What Equipment Do You Take?
Less is more.  The faster I set-up/ break-down, the smoother things are.  I always bring 2 guitars (1 main guitar, 1 back-up) and an extra shirt (I tend to sweat when playing in 104 degrees).  Here’s my checklist.

What’s The Most/ Least Amount Of People You’ve Playing In Front Of?
The Shea gig was 50,000+ – everything else, not so much.  I have different guitar settings for the amount of people in the crowd.  The emptier the arena (especially domed arenas), the more sounds will echo.  If it’s a packed house, I add echoes to my sound but let the venue dictate the echoes in less crowded settings.

Why Not Play It Like Hendrix?
1. Because I can’t.  2. I’m not Hendrix.  3. Because it’s been done.  4. It’s a different era.  Sport teams want a conservative version.  Years ago I sent a crazy rock version I did and got a call back from a team saying I’d get boo-ed if I played it that way.  I still think what I put together was original, catchy and enjoyable but oh well.  The more violent the sport, the more likely I’ll play a rock version than a conservative version.  There’s only been one occasion where someone hasn’t asked if I would play the Hendrix version.

What’s The Process To Get Booked?
After mailing in your submission, they’ll get back to you if interested.  Sometimes they have a number of dates to pick from or just one to fill.  Parking, arrival times/ sound check, comp tickets, etc. are sorted out beforehand.  When you get there, you’ll usually get your pass(es) at will call/ front desk.  The person I’ve traded emails with is usually the game time contact but not always.  If there’s a soundcheck, it’s before the gates open and usually lasts about 1 minute (ie “Can you can hear your guitar?  Yes?  Ok – we’re done”).  Then you wait for hours and are expected back about 10 minutes before performance time.  It’s over in a flash I get off the court/ field asap.  Hopefully there’s a secure place to store my gear so I can enjoy the game!  No two anthem gigs are alike – even if you’ve played the venue before.

Any Crazy Stories?
Aside from the time I forgot to bring my guitars? True story – I left my house with everything except my guitars one time.  Luckily, my wife did the “idiot check” (ie ask me what I’m forgetting) and we had enough time to turn around and get them.  Then there was the time the front desk employee told us to stand and wait in the corner for 20 minutes while the Game Operations staff came to get us.  I remember one time getting the countdown to when I’d be live and still wasn’t getting any signal out of my guitar until 3 seconds before playing (a cable became unplugged when it was being moved around by game staff).  All those things happened at the same gig, by the way.  I won’t even get into the time I was told to be back in the waiting room at 6.45pm and heard my introduction at 6.40pm while I was roaming around the stadium…

How Can I Get Those Gigs?
Keep trying: I get rejected (ie never hear back) more than I get accepted.  Be thankful: build upon each experience, learn from them and use that knowledge to better yourself. Lastly, remember to send your submissions in well before the start of the season.  Some baseball teams won’t accept submissions after mid-February even though the season starts in April.  Be courteous and mindful that they get 1,000s of submissions each year so make what you send stand out.  Never burn any bridges – it’s not worth it.

Have more questions? Please leave them in the “Comment” box below!

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My Thoughts On Kickstarter

Ah, yes – one of the more frequent questions I get: why am I not on KickstarterKickstarter is a “funding platform” for creative projects such as CDs, film, design, etc.  One sets a financial goal and people can then donate towards that goal.  Depending on the amount you give, different funding levels receive different product (ie someone who gives $5 gets a free song download whereas someone who gives $100 gets their name on in the linear notes and demo versions).  If the goal is reached, the artist gets the funds but should time run out before the goal is met, the project does not get funded.  It’s all or nothing.

Let me first start by saying I think this is a great idea, although it’s nothing new.  Over the years, I’ve seen amazing musicians struggle to get their music out while having to make concessions due to cost constraints.  Some have set up PayPal accounts for donations while others simply include mailing addresses on their websites for people to contribute to their cause.

With that being said, these types of programs aren’t for me.  Whether it’s my discomfort with asking people for money without anything to show for it or if it’s my inability to properly market myself, I simply don’t have it in me to ask people for money.  I know I’m not a huge fan of someone asking me for money so why put that someone else in the same position?

My thought process has been the same since day one – put out a demo, if there’s a demand and it sells, use that money towards a professionally released full-length CD.  I put out a demo in 2003 as a tester: will people pay $5 to listen to music without words?  750 sales later, I released a fully-mastered “Inside The Unsaid” with updated songs and additional music.  In 2009, my “MMIX.EP” demo was released with a performance at the Hard Rock Cafe.  The support received from that recording has now allowed me to proudly promote my digitally mastered full-length CD, “Show Me The Way To Go Home“.

Increasingly, quality recording equipment is becoming more affordable.  MP3’s are now the dominant way of listening to music.  Why spend thousands of dollars when I have the ability to record on my laptop and know that 99% of the people who hear my music will eventually downgrade/ compress the quality to a MP3 file anyway?  CD quality vs MP3 quality is a whole other discussion…

Those who seek funding will be quick to point out: musicians deserve to be paid and will outline the cost of studio time, mastering, CD duplication, etc.  That’s all well and good.  I’m not knocking anyone – simply put, it’s not for me.

Now please buy my new CD so I can continue recording.  Thanks!!

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Playing With Tommy Lee, Well Kinda – But Not Really…

Back in 2009, Motley Crue drummer Tommy Lee asked the public to help out with his latest side project, A Public Disservice Announcement, by Methods of Mayhem.  Using ThePublicRecord.com as it’s forum, Lee posted demos (ie “stems”) which users could then download, record off of and re-submit with their additions.  I didn’t get into the game until it was almost over but did lay down guitar parts for 2 songs: “Drunk Uncle Pete” & “Rise Up”.

There was some controversy about the album.  American music industry figure/ blogger and part-time ruffler of the feathers to artists such as Kid Rock and Gene Simmons, Bob Lefsetz, took to the web stating Lee was doing it for the money and as a drummer, he was using the public to write the songs for him.  Lee shot back stating everything was freely made available, most parts were already written and wished some of his favorite bands did the same when he was starting out.  Read the whole exchange on Lee’s MySpace page.

Knowing my parts were unlikely to be selected in this worldwide competition, I still submitted my version of “Drunk Uncle Pete”.  All the guitar parts were based on the skeleton tracks made available to everyone.  Some examples were posted on YouTube and others via their personal websites.  Here is my submission – it’s me, Tommy, bass & vocals:

Rise Up” did not appear on the album listing and I don’t know why it was left off.  My parts ranged from Rage Against The Machine riffing to Joe Satriani soloing.  I really dug what I recorded.  There was no bass – just me, Tommy and background vocals.  Enjoy!

As the September release date neared, it was revealed that the winners would find out upon the CD’s release.  In a promotional TV interview, Tommy mentioned those chosen would find out after buying his CD and seeing their name(s) in the linear notes.  Well played, Mr. Lee.  Regardless, it was a great experience and am grateful for the opportunity.

If anyone has this CD and sees my name in the credits, please email me!  Until then, I congratulate those selected and hope something like this comes around again.

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